Another Patent Infringement Defense for Inducement Rejected by the Supreme Court

On May 26, in Commil USA, LLC v. Cisco Systems, Inc., the Supreme Court rejected arguments for an extension to an already existent patent infringement defense: that the alleged infringer lacked the requisite intent to infringe. A good faith belief that another’s patent is invalid may already provide a defense to patent infringement, but the Court determined that the same defense could not extend to cases of “induced infringement.”

What's "intent" got to do with patent infringement? The Supreme Court tells us. Read more about Patent Infringement.  

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In addition to Thriving Attorney, Darin M. Klemchuk is founder of Klemchuk LLP, a litigation, intellectual property, and transactional law firm located in Dallas, Texas.  He also co-founded Project K, a charity devoted to changing the world one random act of kindness at a time.  Click to read more about Darin Klemchuk's practice as an intellectual property lawyer.

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